Tag: Rodrigo Lopez

Rodrig . . . ut oh

Rodrigo Lopez started yesterday’s game against the Braves and probably wishes he hadn’t after surrendering eight runs over two ugly innings. Lopez came into the game having thrown seven shutout innings in official spring action, but leaves with a 7.00 ERA and a 1.89 ratio.

The Phils made three errors in the game and lost 17-10.

Brown hit a two-run homer in the contest, his fifth of the spring. 3-for-4 on the day ups his line to 400/471/683. He leads the team in home runs and runs scored. He’s scored 20 run this spring, which leads all players across both leagues by a wide margin. San Diego’s Kyle Blanks is second and he has scored 14 runs.

Betancourt was 4-for-5 with a double and two RBI. 450/455/525. If you had asked me what Yuniesky Betancourt was going to hit in spring training, I would have said under .450.

Howard was 2-for-4 with a pair of singles to up his spring average to .321.

Revere also 2-for-4 with two RBI. 328/359/410.

Ruf continues to hit after a super slow start. 2-for-5 with a pair of doubles and a pair of strikeouts. He’s up to 224/309/388. He continues to struggle in left. In the second inning, Freddie Freeman hit a ball deep to left. Ruf almost picked the ball off to take the home run away, but it went off his glove and cleared the fence. It’s been that kind of a spring for him.

Quintero, Revere and Howard made errors for the Phillies in the game.

Lopez started the game for the Phillies and allowed eight runs over two innings on eight hits, including two home runs, and two walks. Only seven of the runs were earned. Justin Upton hit a two-run homer off of him in the first and Freddie Freeman hit a two-run shot in the second.

Lopez’s ERA goes from 0.00 for the spring to 7.00 with the outing. He came into the start having allowed six hits and a walk over seven shutout innings and leaves it with a 1.89 ratio.

Stutes pitched the fourth inning for the Phils, allowing a solo home run to Juan Francisco and a single.

4.50 ERA and a 1.50 ratio for Stutes over eight innings. He had not allowed a home run coming into yesterday’s outing. He’s walked four over his eight innings.

Bastardo followed Stutes and allowed the first three men he faced to reach on a walk and two singles on his way to allowing two earned runs in the frame.

Bastardo’s ERA is up to 5.40. Three of the seven runs that he’s allowed in official spring action are unearned.

Cook followed Bastardo and threw the last three innings of the game, allowing three runs, two of which were earned, on four hits and a walk. He set the Braves down in order in the sixth. In the seventh he allowed a run on a walk, a passed ball and a single. In the eighth the Braves scored two runs on two singles and a triple.

Cook is tied for Lannan for the team lead in official spring innings pitched at 14. 3.21 ERA with a 1.36 ratio. Just four strikeouts in 14 innings.

Colt Murray also pitched for the Phils and allowed three runs in an inning.

Kyle Kendrick is expected to pitch this afternoon as the Phillies play the Yankees.

Cliff Lee was fantastic pitching in a minor league game yesterday, striking out nine in six shutout innings. He threw 80 pitches and allowed four hits and no walks.

This suggests that Galvis, Betancourt and Frandsen are still battling for two spots on the bench. All three of them have hit very well this spring — between the three they are 47-for-142 (.331) with five walks, 13 doubles, two triples and four home runs. Betancourt has clearly been the best of the three with the bat after a huge day yesterday. Galvis is on-basing .298 and Frandsen .327. Not sure it’s going to matter.

It’s not clear when Halladay will pitch in a game again. Could be Friday or Saturday. Could be a lot of days, actually, but Friday or Saturday are some of them.

Rollins is back with the team after hitting .321 in the World Baseball Classic, but may not be in the lineup until Friday.

Lopez has been reassigned to minor league camp.


Orr Pete could homer and everyone could go home

The Phillies got great pitching yesterday and a late home run from Pete Orr, beating the Pirates 2-1.

Cook and Lopez combined to throw five scoreless innings for the Phils to start the game. Neither of them have much of a chance to start the year in the rotation for the Phils, but both of them have better results in official spring training games than anyone who actually is in the rotation with the exception of Hamels. Hamels got hammered in a game against the Dominican Republic that didn’t count towards official spring statistics.

Orr homered in the bottom of the eighth to break a 1-1 tie. It was his only at-bat of the game. He’s 3-for-11 with two home runs so far this spring.

Utley had two hits. He was 2-for-4 with a double. 206/357/353.

Inciarte was 1-for-3 with a double. He also threw Brad Hawpe out trying to score from second on a single to end the top of the second. The double was the first extra-base hit of the spring for Inciarte. He’s 5-for-17 with a double and three walks (294/429/353).

Ruf and Howard both 1-for-3 with a single. Ruf’s line is up to 211/318/368, but it doesn’t seem like it’s going to matter a ton if he’s not usable defensively.

Brown and Nix 0-for-3. Nix is hitting 219/265/313 in 32 official spring at-bats. Galvis 0-for-4 to drop his line to 283/313/500.

Aaron Cook got the start for the Phillies and went three shutout innings, allowing a single and a walk. After 11 innings, he has a 2.45 ERA with a 1.27 ratio.

Rodrigo Lopez followed Cook and threw two scoreless frames in which he allowed three hits and no walks. Lopez didn’t fare as well in the World Baseball Classic, but his numbers in official spring action are fantastic. Seven scoreless innings in which he’s allowed six hits and a walk (0.00 ERA with a 1.00 ratio).

Papelbon struck out Andrew McCutchen and Hawpe in a 1-2-3 sixth. That drops his ERA to 19.64. He has struck out seven in 3 2/3 innings, so we all might just want to try and calm down a little.

Aumont pitched the seventh and was charged with a run on one hit. He allowed a single to Neil Walker to start the frame and hit the next batter. Walker moved up to third on a fly ball and scored on a wild pitch.

Aumont has a 3.00 ERA but an impressive 0.67 ratio in three spring appearances.

Diekman pitched a scoreless eighth. He allowed back-to-back singles to the first two hitters he faced, but got out of the jam with a strikeout and a double-play.

Diekman has struck out 14 in nine innings over his seven appearances, but thrown to a 5.00 ERA with a 1.44 ratio. Opponents are hitting .314 against him.

Cesar Jimenez started the ninth with a one-run lead and got the save. He got the first two hitters before allowing a single and a double, which put men on second third for Felix Pie. Jimenez struck Pie out looking 0-2 to end the game.

Jimenez has allowed five hits in 2 2/3 innings over his three appearances, but has not been charged with a run. Opponents are hitting .385 against him.

Lannan is expected to start this afternoon as the Phils play the Rays.

The Phillies announced the Cole Hamels will start on Opening Day.

The Dominican Republic scored two runs in the top of the ninth to beat the US in the World Baseball Classic 3-1. Rollins was 0-for-4 and struck out twice. The US team faces Puerto Rico tonight in an elimination game.


Log jog

I finalized the Start Log for 2012.

I think there’s some interesting stuff there that reminds a lot about what went wrong for the Phillies in 2012.

Looking at the blue band in the middle and starting at the top, we see the team’s record by starting pitcher. Some highlights:

  • The Phillies went 14-11 in Halladay’s starts in 2012. Coming into the season, in Halladay’s two years with the Phils the team was 46-19 in the games he started.
  • 21-10 in games started by Hamels, by far the best mark of any pitcher on the team. The Phils finished the year 81-81, so that means they were 60-71 when someone other than Hamels started. That’s a little remarkable given that two of the team’s other starters were Cliff Lee and Roy Halladay.
  • In 2011, the Phillies won 15 or more games in the starts made by four different pitchers (24-8 under Halladay, 18-13 Hamels, 22-10 Lee and 16-5 Worley). In 2012, the team only won 15 or more games in the starts made by Hamels.
  • The Phillies went 23-32 when Lee or Worley started. They were 38-15 in starts by that duo in 2011 (22-10 when Lee started and 16-5 when Worley started). In 2011, the Phillies had a better record in Worley’s 21 starts (16-5 for a .762 winning percentage) than they did in Halladay’s starts (24-8, .750).
  • Despite a nice year from Kendrick, the team was still just 11-14 in the games he started. The Phillies went 1-9 in the first ten games in which Kendrick appeared in 2012 — he started five of those games and appeared in relief in the other five. Over the last two season the Phils are 30-41 in games in which Kendrick appeared and 18-22 in the 40 games that he started.
  • 11-9 in the Blanton starts. The Blanton era ends in Philly with good results for the team. He made exactly 100 starts for the Phils between 2008 and 2012 with the Phillies going 58-42 in the games that he started. Since 2008, the Phillies have won about as many games that were started by Blanton (58) as they have games started by Halladay (60). Blanton has made 100 starts for the Phils over the last five seasons while Halladay has made 90. Hamels is the only pitcher who has started more games that the Phillies won over the past five season — they are 92-68 in games started by Hamels since the beginning of ’08.

The Phillies have signed 37-year-old right-handed pitcher Rodrigo Lopez to a minor league deal. Lopez made seven appearances with the Phillies in 2009, ending the year with a 5.70 ERA. He had a 3.09 ERA with a 1.37 ratio through his first four starts and took a 3.99 ERA into his final appearance of the season on August 9. Lopez allowed six runs in two-thirds of an inning in that game, which was also memorable because Shane Victorino was ejected for arguing balls and strikes while he was in center field with the other team batting. Lopez will try to make the team in spring training as an NRI.

This mailbag from the Phillies web site mentions Humberto Quintero and Zach Miner as top candidates to make the team to start the year among the non-roster invitees. I will be surprised if Miner makes the team to start the year and surprised if Qunitero does not. The same article suggests the possibility of bringing Delmon Young to the Phillies and mentions his “baggage” as one of the reasons that might be difficult. Another is he is a bad defensive outfielder and has had two bad years offensively in a row. The mailbag also guesses that Cloyd will start the year in Triple-A.

This article suggests that the Phillies could easily be in rebuilding mode by July. The Phils would have a real tough time rebuilding if they weren’t able to trade Howard, Utley and Halladay. I would guess they would have some difficulty trading Howard at this point unless they were willing to pay a whole lot of his salary.


It’s not the heat, it’s . . . okay, let’s hope it’s the heat

The Phils got pounded by the Cubs last night, losing 6-1 in a game that was most remarkable for the circumstances surrounding the departure of Roy Halladay. Halladay left in the fifth inning looking very hot and not at all well. Word is that Halladay expects to make his next start.

The bullpen also scuffled in the game. Coming off of a series in which the relievers combined to allow nine runs in 9 1/3 innings, Carpenter and Herndon combined to surrender three runs in four innings in relief of Halladay. Going back to June 23 (when the pen allowed eight runs in six innings to the Cardinals), the bullpen has thrown to a 6.46 ERA and a 1.54 ratio over the last 20 games for the Phillies. In four of those 20 games the pen has allowed at least four runs in a game and in two others they allowed three. In the 75 games before the June 23 game, the bullpen threw to a 2.80 ERA and a 1.29 ratio.

The Phillies are 59-36 on the year after losing to the Chicago Cubs 6-1 last night. They are in first place in the NL East, 2 1/2 games ahead of the Braves. Atlanta is 44-24 since the end of April while the Phils have gone 41-28.

Halladay got the start for the Phillies and went four innings, allowing three runs on seven hits and a walk. One of the hits went for extra-bases, a solo home run. He struck out one.

He got the first two batters to start the bottom of the first before Aramis Ramirez hit the first pitch he saw out to left center, putting the Cubs on top 1-0. Carlos Pena followed that with a single to center, but Halladay got Marlon Bryd to fly to center to end the inning.

He got three ground balls as he set Chicago down in order in the second.

The pitcher Rodrigo Lopez led off the third with a single to right and Kosuke Fukudome walked behind him. Starlin Castro followed that with a single to left, which loaded the bases for Ramirez. Ramirez flew to right for the first out, deep enough for Lopez to tag and score and Fukudome to take third. 2-0 with men on first and third. Pena singled to right and Fukudome scored. 3-0 with men on first and second. Halladay got Byrd and Alfonso Soriano on a pair of fly balls to prevent further damage.

It was 3-1 when Halladay started the fourth. Darwin Barney singled with one out and Lopez bunted him to second, but Halladay got Fukudome to fly to Brown in right to leave Barney stranded.

Castro started the fifth with a single to center and Halladay didn’t look real good after the at-bat, bent over with his hands on his knees. He left the game and Carpenter took over to pitch to Ramirez. Ramirez flew to center for the first out before Castro stole second. Carpenter walked Pena, putting men on first and second. Castro tried to steal third and thrown out for the second out. Byrd followed that with a ball off the glove of Martinez and into left for a single that moved Castro up to second. Soriano grounded to second to end the inning.

The caught stealing by Castro costs the Cubs a run. Close play at third, but I think he was out. Nice throw by Ruiz.

Carpenter walked Koyie Hill to start the sixth and Hill stole second before Barney doubled off the wall in left. Hill scored and Chicago led 4-1. Lopez bunted Barney to third before Fukudome doubled down the right field line, scoring Barney to make it 5-1. Carpenter got Castro on a line drive to Rollins for the second out and struck out Ramirez to end the inning with Fukudome stranded.

Carpenter goes two innings, allowing two runs on three hits and two walks to raise his ERA on the year to 7.11. He has been charged with at least one run in three of his four appearances on the year.

Herndon started the seventh and Pena homered on a 3-1 pitch to put Chicago up 6-1. Byrd followed that with a double on a ball that was deflected by Brown in right, but Herndon struck out Soriano and Hill and got Barney on a fly ball to center to leave Byrd stranded.

Herndon set the Cubs down in order in the eighth.

Two innings for Herndon, allowing a run on two hits and no walks. He’s had four bad outings in a row going back to June 30. Over those four appearances, he’s gone 6 1/3 innings and been charged with six runs on 13 hits. True to form he hasn’t walked anyone. In three of the four outings he’s allowed a home run and opponents are slugging .781 against him.

Carpenter and Herndon both threw 31 pitches.

The Phillies lineup against righty Rodrigo Lopez went (1) Rollins (2) Martinez (3) Utley (4) Howard (5) Ibanez (6) Ruiz (7) Brown (8) Mayberry. Martinez plays third with Polanco on the DL and Mayberry continues to handle center for Victorino.

The Phils went in order in the top of the first.

Down 1-0, the Phils went in order in the second. And again in the third.

It was 3-0 when Rollins led off the fourth and hit a 1-0 pitch from Lopez out to right for his ninth home run of the year, cutting the lead to 3-1. Martinez and Utley went down behind him before Howard hit a ball that Barney didn’t handle for an error. Ibanez went down on a popup that Barney handled in foul territory to leave Howard at first.

Mayberry doubled to center with two outs in the fifth, but Halladay struck out behind him.

Martinez singled with one out in the sixth and moved to second when Utley was hit by a pitch. Howard got an extra chance when Soriano dropped a foul ball in left for an error, but flew to Byrd for the second out. Ibanez struck out to leave both runners stranded.

Ruiz singled to start the seventh with the Phils down 5-1, but Brown grounded into a double-play behind him. Mayberry followed that with a single into center, putting a man on first for Carpenter with two outs. With the righty Lopez still pitching for the Cubs, Orr hit for Carpenter and Chicago brought lefty James Russell in to pitch to him. Francisco hit for Orr and grounded to second to set the Phils down.

Francisco is 4-for-his-last-14 with three doubles. He’s still doing nothing against lefties for the season, having hit 198/301/309 against them so far. His numbers against right-handed pitching aren’t so far off his career levels — he’s hitting 242/351/395 against righties compare to a career mark of 259/327/434.

Down 6-1, the Phils went in order in the eighth.

Ruiz and Brown walked back-to-back with two outs in the ninth, but Mayberry struck out swinging 3-2 to end the game.

Rollins was 1-for-4 with a home run. He’s hitting 362/413/500 in 63 plate appearances in July so far. It wasn’t a factor last night, but he’s been miserable against left-handed pitching this year, hitting 232/267/295.

Martinez was 1-for-4 with a strikeout. He’s 2-for-his-last-14.

Utley 0-for-3 and was hit by a pitch. He’s 1-for-his-last-14 and 4-for-his-last-28. 250/337/341 over his last 102 plate appearances.

Howard 0-for-4 to drop his average to .249. 1-for-his-last-15. 5-for-his-last-33 with five singles. 203/306/297 over his last 85 plate appearances.

Ibanez 0-for-4 and left three men on base. 357/372/667 in 43 plate appearances over his last nine games, raising his line on the year from 231/279/386 to 246/290/421.

Ruiz 1-for-3 with a walk. He’s 8-for-his-last-19 with a double, a home run and four walks.

Brown 0-for-3 with a walk. He’s 0-for-his-last-10.

Mayberry 2-for-4 with a double. He’s played eight full games since July 6, hitting 286/306/629 (10-for-35 with six doubles, two home runs, a walk and 12 RBI).

Cliff Lee (9-6, 2.82) faces righty Matt Garza (4-7, 3.97) tonight. Two of Garza’s last three starts have been very good. On July 2 he threw a complete game against the White Sox, allowing a run on four hits and two walks. In his most recent start he threw seven shutout innings against the Marlins. In between he was hammered by the Nats, charged with seven runs in two innings. In nine starts at home this year he’s 3-3 with a 2.88 ERA. Lee has had one bad start since the beginning of June, which came on July 3 when he allowed seven runs to the Blue Jays in 7 1/3 innings. In his other six starts since the end of May, Lee has gone 5-0 and allowed two earned runs in 50 innings (0.36 ERA with an 0.68 ratio).

The Phils are expected to activate Victorino for tonight’s game. Orr was sent to Triple-A.


And coming soon, runs allowed per batter faced based on who is watching

After looking at how the runs allowed per plate appearance changed by catcher for 2009, I thought it might be interesting to look at how they changed depending on who was pitching.

The table below shows, for each player who pitched for the Phillies in 2009, the rate at which the pitcher allowed runs per batter faced and the rate at which all Phillies pitchers other than that pitchers allowed runs per batter faced. The rightmost column shows the second column over the third.

Player RA per Batter Rest of Team
Scott Eyre 0.047 0.115 0.409
JA Happ 0.080 0.117 0.686
Tyler Walker 0.080 0.114 0.701
J.C. Romero 0.082 0.114 0.723
Ryan Madson 0.091 0.114 0.792
Steven Register 0.091 0.113 0.803
Pedro Martinez 0.094 0.114 0.828
Clay Condrey 0.098 0.114 0.859
Kyle Kendrick 0.098 0.114 0.865
Joe Blanton 0.106 0.114 0.930
Cliff Lee 0.107 0.114 0.942
Sergio Escalona 0.117 0.113 1.031
Cole Hamels 0.117 0.113 1.035
Chan Ho Park 0.119 0.113 1.052
Chad Durbin 0.121 0.113 1.073
Brett Myers 0.125 0.113 1.110
Jack Taschner 0.126 0.113 1.114
Jamie Moyer 0.130 0.111 1.172
Antonio Bastardo 0.170 0.112 1.513
Rodrigo Lopez 0.175 0.112 1.566
Brad Lidge 0.180 0.110 1.637
Andrew Carpenter 0.219 0.113 1.941

For example, Scott Eyre faced 128 batters in 2009 and was charged with six runs, or .047 runs per batter. The entire Phillies team faced 6,261 batters and allowed 709 runs. If you subtract Eyre’s work from that, all Phillies pitchers besides Eyre faced 6,133 batters and allowed 703 runs. That’s about .115 runs per batter faced. If you put .047 (Eyre’s runs allowed per batter) over .115 (the rest of the team’s runs allowed per batter) you get .409, which also means that Eyre allowed about 40.9% of the runs per plate appearance that the rest of the pitchers on the team allowed.

One thing that was surprising to me about the list was how close to the middle Cliff Lee wound up. One thing to remember is that, given how much he pitched, Lee allowed a bunch of unearned runs. Five of the 35 runs he allowed were unearned, which is 14.3%. Overall for the team, 5.1% of the runs allowed by Phillies pitching was unearned. Condrey, Eyre, Lopez and Romero also all had more than 10% of the runs they allowed in ’09 go as unearned.

Curious also to me is that Blanton’s runs allowed per batter was a tiny bit better than Lee’s. Forgetting ERA, Lee still had a better runs allowed per nine innings than Blanton did — 3.95 for Lee and 4.10 for Blanton. That means Blanton must have faced more batters per inning. And he did. Blanton faced about 4.28 batters per inning in ’09 while Lee faced about 4.10 batters per inning while with the Phils.

Finally, I’ve said this before but I am worried about the Phillies bullpen. They didn’t come in especially important situations, but the Phils got good relief work from Eyre, Condrey, Walker, Park and Moyer last year. It’s not clear to me how they plan to make up for those guys with the players that currently seem to be set up to pitch out of the bullpen. A better year from Lidge should help, but I think they’re going to need more than that.

This article looks at the players the Phillies will have at spring training.

It seems to me there’s little to find out about the offense in spring training. It looks pretty set with 13 hitters: Ruiz, Howard, Utley, Rollins, Polanco, Ibanez, Victorino, Werth, Schneider, Castro, Gload, Dobbs and Francisco.

The pitching seems like a whole different story. It looks like Moyer is the fifth starter if he’s healthy and I’d guess it’s Kendrick if he’s not, but the bullpen is a mess. Madson, Durbin, Baez and Contreras are the only guys I think we should be counting to be on the team on opening day. Lidge and Romero are in if they’re healthy, but I’m guessing we go 0-for-2 on that front. Bastardo and Escalona look like they will battle for a job as a lefty out of the pen, but it seems like two slots to start the year are pretty wide open when things get going (assuming Lidge and Romero start the year on the DL). I keep waiting for the Phillies to sign a reliever and it keeps not happening. Assuming Romero isn’t able to start the year it seems like Escalona and Bastardo could both be pitching out of the pen to start the year. My guess at this point is that the 12 pitchers on the opening day roster for the Phils are: Halladay, Hamels, Blanton, Happ, Moyer, Madson, Durbin, Baez, Contreras, Escalona, Bastardo and Kendrick.


Division of labor

Trying to guess who the Phillies might have playing third base next year is kinda fun, but what kind of year the Phils have in 2010 is going to have a lot more to do with what they can do to improve their pitching this off-season.

In 2009 the Phillies used 22 pitchers. They combined to throw 1,455 2/3 innings and allow 709 runs.

Ten of the 22 pitchers that the Phillies used had a percentage of the team’s 1,455 2/3 innings that they threw that was higher than their percentage of the team’s 709 runs that they allowed.

They are in the chart below. For each of the ten there are columns for the percentage of the team’s innings that they pitched, the percentage of the team’s runs that they allowed, the percentage of the runs allowed over the percentage of the innings pitched and the rank of that column compared to the other players in this group. The list is ordered by the number of innings that the player threw for the Phils in 2009.

  % of IP
% of Runs
allowed
Runs
Allowed/IP
Rank for
group
Blanton 13.4 12.6 0.94 10
Happ 11.4 7.8 0.68 2
Lee 5.5 4.9 0.90 9
Madson 5.3 4.1 0.77 5
Martinez 3.1 2.5 0.83 6
Condrey 2.9 2.4 0.83 7
Walker 2.4 1.7 0.70 3
Eyre 2.1 0.8 0.41 1
Kendrick 1.8 1.6 0.86 8
Romero 1.1 0.8 0.74 4

So, for example, Joe Blanton threw about 13.4% of the Phillies innings this season and allowed about 12.6% of the runs. 12.6 over 13.4 is 0.94, which is tenth best among the ten players who allowed a percentage of runs that was lower than the percentage of innings they pitched.

Please note that the rounding of the two percentage columns makes the math look wrong. For example, Eyre’s row shows 2.1 and 0.8, but .8 over 2.1 equals about 0.38 and not 0.41 — that’s cause the numbers are really 2.061 and 0.846 and not 2.1 and .8.

When you look at the difference between the percentage of the runs allowed and percentage of innings pitched it’s important to take into account the number of innings pitched. Eyre had the most dramatic difference between the two numbers, but Blanton was a lot more important to the team despite the worse difference since he threw more than six times as many innings as Eyre.

There were 12 pitchers for the Phils this year who allowed a percentage of the team’s runs that was higher than the percentage of the teams’ innings that pitcher threw. Here are the 12, using the same categories as above (the ranking continues from where the top list left off):

  % of IP
% of Runs
allowed
Runs
Allowed/IP
Rank for
team
Hamels 13.3 13.4 1.01 11
Moyer 11.1 12.8 1.15 17
Park 5.7 6.1 1.06 14
Myers 4.9 5.4 1.10 15
Durbin 4.8 5.4 1.12 16
Lidge 4.0 7.2 1.78 21
Lopez 2.1 3.4 1.64 20
Taschner 2.0 2.5 1.26 18
Bastardo 1.6 2.5 1.56 19
Escalona 0.9 1.0 1.05 13
Carpenter 0.4 1.0 2.54 22
Register 0.1 0.1 1.03 12

Again, the number of innings that the pitcher threw is critical. Andrew Carpenter was miserable compared to the rest of the group, but he only threw 5 2/3 innings. Guys who threw more innings, like Lidge and Moyer especially, obviously hurt the Phils more.

Article here about what some Phillies prospects have been doing in the AFL and winter leagues. If you don’t know who Sebastian Valle is it might be time to find out.

It sure seems like there’s a big opportunity for Mayberry these days. He’s hitting 314/390/521 in Mexico with seven home runs in 121 at-bats. It wasn’t a great year from him at Triple-A, but it’s nice to see him taking more walks in 2009 than he did in ’08 or ’07 — take a look at his minor league numbers.


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