pitching

Worser by far

The point of the last post was that the Phillies were extremely bad in 2013, perhaps better than only the Marlins in the 15-team National League.

Today’s point is that relative to the rest of the league, the Phillies were worse at preventing runs last year than they were at scoring them. That’s not to suggest that they couldn’t have been miserable at both — they were, in fact, miserable at both. But worse at preventing them than they were at scoring them.

The Phillies scored 3.77 runs per game in 2013 in a year when the average NL team scored 4.0 runs per game. So they scored about 94% of the average runs per game in the NL for the season.

They allowed about 116% of the average runs allowed in the league for the season, giving up 4.69 runs per game in a year when the average NL team allowed 4.04.

Using runs per game, the Phillies were better than only the Rockies at preventing runs in 2013. The Rockies allowed 4.76 runs per game, a very similar mark to the 4.69 surrendered by the Phillies.

Both the Phils and the Rockies were way above the rest of the NL in runs allowed per game. The Phillies were 14th in the category and the Padres were 13th. San Diego allowed 4.33 runs per game, more than a third of a run less per game than the Phils.

The Phillies also had two outstanding pitchers in Cliff Lee and Cole Hamels — each of them finished the year in the top ten in the NL in WAR for pitchers as calculated by both Baseball-Reference and FanGraphs.

bWAR NL Rank fWAR NL Rank
Lee 7.3 2 5.1 4
Hamels 4.6 7 4.2 8

Lee was top five at each of the sites and Hamels top ten. The problem was pretty much everybody else. Here’s some of the numbers for Lee and Hamels as well as the other pitchers on the team compared to NL averages for 2013:

IP ERA Ratio
Lee and Hamels 442 2/3 3.23 1.08
All other PHI P 993 2/3 4.80 1.50
Team Total 1436 1/3 4.34 1.37
NL Avg - 3.73 1.28

In a year when the average NL pitcher threw to a 3.73 ERA and a 1.28 ratio, all of the pitchers on the Phillies other than Lee and Hamels combined to pitch to a 4.80 ERA with a 1.50 ratio. That requires some pitchers having some miserable years and the Phillies had them. Lannan, Martin, Horst, Cloyd, Halladay, Valdes, Ramirez, Durbin and outfielder Casper Wells all threw to an ERA over 5.00 on the year and everyone on that list other than Lannan threw to an ERA over 6.00. Cloyd, Lannan and Halladay all threw at least 60 innings on the season. Cloyd, Halladay, Martin and Lannan combined to make 46 starts (about 28.4% of the team’s starts) for the season and threw to a 5.97 ERA in in 236 2/3 innings in those starts.


That’s my story and I’m sticking to it

So just how bad was it this year?

We can all agree that it wasn’t good. But how bad was it? I’d say the Phillies were better than the Marlins in the National League this season. If want to argue for more than that, you’re on your own.

There are 15 teams in the National League. Twelve of them won more than the 73 games that the Phillies won this year, although three of them, the Rockies, Brewers and Mets, won just one game more (74) than the Phillies and the Giants and the Rockies both won 76. The Phillies won more games than the Cubs (66) and the Marlins (62).

The Phillies scored more runs per game than each of the teams they finished ahead of in the wins column (Miami and Chicago). They were 13th in the NL in runs scored with 3.77 runs per game. The Cubs were 14th at 3.72 and both Chicago and the Phils buried the Marlins. The Fish scored an NL-worst 3.17 runs per game.

Here’s the runs scored per game in the NL for 2013:

Team
STL
COL
CIN
ATL
ARI
WSN
LAD
NLavg
MIL
PIT
SFG
NYM
SDP
PHI
CHC
MIA
G
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
R
783
706
698
688
685
656
649
649
640
634
629
619
618
610
602
513
R/G
4.83
4.36
4.31
4.25
4.23
4.05
4.01
4.00
3.95
3.91
3.88
3.82
3.81
3.77
3.72
3.17

Again, Phillies were bad at scoring runs this season, but better than the Cubs and way better than the Marlins. Everyone was better than the Marlins at scoring runs this year. By a lot. The 3.17 runs per game scored by the Fish was the lowest runs scored per game number for any NL team since the Padres scored 3.02 runs per game in 1971. 1971? If you think about it relative to the average number of runs scored in the NL by year, it’s not quite as bad. The 3.17 runs scored per game for the Marlins this year was about 79.25% of the league average of 4.00. You only have to go back to the ’03 Dodgers to get a mark that bad. In 2003, Los Angeles scored 3.54 runs per game in a season in which the league average was 4.61. 3.54 is about 76.8% of 4.61.

Still, the point is that the Marlins was truly awful at scoring runs this season.

Chicago and the Fish were way better at preventing runs than the Phillies, though. The only team the Phils were better at preventing runs than this season was the Rockies:

Tm
ATL
PIT
LAD
CIN
STL
WSN
MIA
NLavg
NYM
MIL
CHC
SFG
ARI
SDP
PHI
COL
G
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
RA
548
577
582
589
596
626
646
655
684
687
689
691
695
700
749
760
RA/G
3.38
3.56
3.59
3.64
3.68
3.86
3.99
4.04
4.22
4.24
4.25
4.27
4.29
4.32
4.62
4.69

Note that there was some separation between the Rockies and the Phils, the two worst teams in the NL at preventing runs this year, and the rest of the group. The Phillies, 14th in the league in runs allowed per game, allowed 4.62 runs per game. The Padres were 13th in the league in runs allowed per game and allowed 4.32 or .3 of a run per game less. Three tenths of a run is a lot. It’s also the same amount that separates the team in the league that was seventh-best at preventing runs, the Marlins at 3.99, with the Diamondbacks who were twelfth in the category at 4.29.

The league average for ERA was 3.73 in 2013. There were only two teams that threw to an ERA over 4.00 and they both did it by a significant margin — the Phillies at 4.34 and the Rockies at 4.44.

So among all the NL teams, the only teams that the Phillies were better than at either scoring or preventing runs for the season were the Marlins, the Cubs and the Rockies. The Phils were better than the Cubs and Marlins at scoring runs and better than the Rockies at preventing them.

The Rockies, of course, were way better at scoring runs than the Phillies. They scored more than half a run more than the Phils and finished second in the NL in the runs scored.

The Cubs and the Marlins both prevented runs a lot better than the Phils. The Fish allowed 3.99 runs per game, which was better than the league average. The Cubs were worse than the NL average at 4.25 runs per game, but still better than the Phils as the Phils allowed .37 runs per game more than the Cubs. The Phils scored .05 runs per game more than Chicago.

As you can probably guess, being miserable at scoring and preventing runs relative to the teams you’re competing against will hurt your statistics that are based on the number of runs you score and allow.

Here are the Pythagoran records for the NL teams, along with their actual records and “luck” as reported by Baseball-Reference. Luck is just a team’s actual wins minus their Pythagorean wins.

Tm
STL
ATL
CIN
LAD
PIT
WSN
ARI
MIL
COL
SFG
NYM
SDP
CHC
PHI
MIA
Actual
97-65
96-66
90-72
92-70
94-68
86-76
81-81
74-88
74-88
76-86
74-88
76-86
66-96
73-89
62-100
pythWL
101-61
98-64
93-69
89-73
88-74
84-78
80-82
76-86
76-86
74-88
74-88
72-90
71-91
66-96
64-98
Luck
-4
-2
-3
3
6
2
1
-2
-2
2
0
4
-5
7
-2

So the Phils are 13th in actual wins but 14th in Pythagorean won/loss record, ahead of only Miami and five Pythagorean wins behind the 13th-Pythagorean place Cubs. Their luck mark, their actual wins minus Pythagorean wins, is seven, which means they won seven more games than would have been expected based on their Pythagorean winning percentage. Seven is the highest mark for any team in the NL this year and the highest for any NL team since the 2010 Houston Astros.

So based on Pythagorean winning percentage, the Phillies were better only than the Fish and only better than the Fish by two games.

Again, there are only three teams in the league that the Phils were better than at either scoring or preventing runs — the Rockies, Cubs and Marlins. It’s pretty hard to mount an argument that the Phillies were better than an NL team other than those three given that all of the other 11 teams in the league 1) had a better actual record than the Phils 2) had a better Pythagorean record than the Phils 3) scored more runs per game than the Phils and 4) allowed fewer runs per game than the Phils.

Among the three teams that they either outscored or were better than at preventing runs, they clearly weren’t better than Colorado. The Rockies and Phillies allowed about the same number of runs on the season, but the Rockies had an elite offense that was second in the league in runs scored while the Phillies were 14th in runs scored. Colorado won more actual games and had a Pythagorean record that was ten wins better than the Phils. I don’t think there’s any argument to be made that the Phillies were better than the Rockies this year.

That leaves the Cubs and the Marlins, the only two teams in the league to win fewer games than the Phillies.

The Cubs won a lot fewer, seven, and finished at 66-96. They did it with a -5 luck as the table above shows, suggesting that, unlike the Phillies, their actual record was a lot worse than you would expect based on the number of runs they scored and allowed.

Unlike the Rockies, who were a miserable team at preventing runs that scored a ton of runs, Chicago was, like the Phillies, bad at both. The Cubs and Phils scored a very similar number of runs, separated only by .05 runs per game, while the Cubs were a whole lot better at preventing runs. Despite being worse than the average NL team at preventing runs, they still allowed more than a third of a run (.37) less per game than the Phillies did. That difference in the number of runs they allowed per game leads them to Pythagorean record that’s five games better than the Phillies despite the fact the Phils actually won seven more games.

Were the Phillies really worse than the Cubs this year? I think they really were.

And the Fish? I think the Phils were actually better than the Marlins, winning 11 more games with a Pythagorean record that was two games better. Miami’s offense was heinous, plating a full sixth-tenths of a run fewer than even the weak Phillie offense per game, but they did a much better job of preventing runs, allowing a better-than-league-average 3.99 per game while the Phils were 14th of the 15 teams in the category.

Mounting an argument that the Marlins were actually better than the Phillies would require one to make the case that Miami’s success at preventing runs was so much better than the Phillies that it was enough to overcome the fact that the Phils fared much better at producing runs.

The Phillies scored about 5.75% fewer runs per game than the average NL team and allowed about 14.36% more runs per game. The Marlins scored about 20.75% fewer runs per game, but were better than league average at preventing runs, allowing about 1.24% fewer runs than league average per game. If you combine each of those numbers for the teams, the Marlins wind up at about -19.51, which is slightly better than the -20.11 for the Phils.

Simpler than that would be to point out that in the same number of games, the run differential for the Marlins was better than the run differential for the Phillies. The Phillies allowed 749 runs and scored 610, which is a run differential of 139. The Marlins allowed 646 and scored 513, a run differential of 133.

Let’s not get nuts, though. They’re the Marlins. They allowed Adeiny Hechavarria, Rob Brantly, Greg Dobbs and Jeff Mathis to combine for 1,344 plate appearances in 2013 in which they put up a 215/270/290 line. The Phillies won 11 more games and had a better Pythagorean record and that’s good enough for me.


Fore!

The Phillies are 4-5 through their first nine games of 2013. Relative to the rest of the league, they’ve scored runs at about the same rate they did over the past two years while allowing a lot more so far this season.

Year Record RS/G (NL Rank) RA/G (NL Rank)
2013 4-5 4.67 (7) 6.00 (15)
2012 81-81 4.22 (8) 4.20 (8)
2011 102-60 4.40 (7) 3.26 (1)
2010 97-65 4.77 (2) 3.95 (4)
2009 93-69 5.06 (1) 4.38 (6)
2008 92-70 4.93 (3) 4.20 (3)

The team ERA for the year is 6.04, which is the worst mark for any team across either league. The Brewers are second-worst in the NL at 5.47. Phillie pitchers have been bad against righties, but they’ve been absolutely decimated by lefties. Lefties are 45-for-118 against them for the season with a 381/434/636 line.

The Phillies are on pace to allow 972 runs this year. The good news is there’s no chance that will happen. If it did, it would be the most runs allowed by an NL team since the Rockies allowed 1,028 in 1999. No NL team has allowed 900 runs since 2004 (Colorado (923) and the Reds (907) both did it that season).

Lannan (0-0, 3.86) faces righty Ricky Nolasco (0-1, 3.97) tonight in Florida. Lannan has made one start on the year and it was good as he held the Royals to three runs on five hits and no walks over seven innings. He didn’t allow a hit until the fifth inning in that game. The Phillies play 17 games in 17 days starting tonight, so let’s hope we see their starters at least in the sixth and seventh over the next few days against the Fish. Nolasco has made two starts on the year, allowing five runs over 11 1/3 innings while walking five.


The murky dozen

Here was the most recent guess about the pitchers who start the year with the team, which came in this post at the end of January:

Other candidates
1 Halladay (R) P Aumont (R)
2 Lee (L) T Cloyd (R)
3 Hamels (L) J De Fratus (R)
4 Kendrick (R) M Schwimer (R)
5 Lannan (L) M Stutes (R)
6 Papelbon (R) BJ Rosenberg (R)
7 Adams (R) E Martin (R)
8 Bastardo (L) J Pettibone (R)
9 JC Ramirez (R)
10 Z Miner (R)
11 J Cruz (R)
12 A Cook (R)
R Lopez (R)
J Friend (R)
K Simon (R)
J Horst (L)
R Valdes (L)
J Diekman (L)
J Savery (L)
M Robles (L)
C Jimenez (L)
A Morgan (L)

There have been some developments since then. The biggest is that Chad Durbin was signed and appears to be a lock to be a righty out of the pen. Juan Cruz and the Phillies have parted ways, presumably because Durbin appears to be a lock to be a righty out of the pen. JC Ramirez was DFA’ed and then sent to Triple-A. And the Phillies signed two lefties who are unlikely to see time with the big league club soon, David Newmann and Corey Young.

So I add Durbin to the list and removed Cruz. Ramirez will still be in camp as an NRI, although he seems like a long shot to start the year with the team, he’s still in the right-hand column of other candidates.

Other candidates
1 Halladay (R) P Aumont (R)
2 Lee (L) T Cloyd (R)
3 Hamels (L) J De Fratus (R)
4 Kendrick (R) M Schwimer (R)
5 Lannan (L) M Stutes (R)
6 Papelbon (R) BJ Rosenberg (R)
7 Adams (R) E Martin (R)
8 Bastardo (L) J Pettibone (R)
9 Durbin (R) JC Ramirez (R)
10 Z Miner (R)
11 A Cook (R)
12 R Lopez (R)
J Friend (R)
K Simon (R)
J Horst (L)
R Valdes (L)
J Diekman (L)
J Savery (L)
M Robles (L)
C Jimenez (L)
A Morgan (L)

So nine slots now filled. Five starters and four relievers. Of the relievers, they have a closer, a setup guy and one lefty.

Assuming 12 pitchers to start the year, they have three open spots.

Last time I guessed I had them with eight filled slots and gave the last four to Horst, Aumont, Valdes and De Fratus, which left the Phils with three lefties in the pen and no true long man.

One big question with the current staff is whether Chad Durbin can pitch more than one inning or if the Phillies will use him to do so. Durbin was very good in 2012, arguably the best he had been since ’08 with the Phils, but didn’t go more than an inning a whole lot of times. Durbin got more than three outs in three of his 76 appearances for Atlanta in ’12. He threw more than 25 pitches in a game in four of 76. In 2008, the Phillies had Durbin throw more than 25 pitches in 18 of 71 appearances. On May 18, 2008, Durbin threw 66 pitches in relief of Kendrick after Kendrick exited after just one inning.

But it’s not 2008 anymore. And I would guess we aren’t going to see Durbin go more than an inning very often. So I’d say they still don’t have a long guy out of the pen.

I really have trouble seeing the Phillies not carry Horst to start the year given his performance in 2012 (he threw to a 1.15 ERA with a 1.12 ratio and 40 strikeouts over 31 1/3 innings).

I think that gets them to ten and leaves them with two slots open. I see Aumont, De Fratus, Stutes and Valdes as the guys with the best chances to fill the remaining slots. Aumont seems to have the biggest upside of the group. De Fratus has been fantastic in the minors in recent years. Stutes will need to prove he’s healthy, but was a big contributor for the 2011 Phils. Valdes threw to a 2.90 ERA with an 0.74 ratio for the Phils in 2012.

Aumont’s upside potential makes me feel like there’s some separation between him and the rest of the candidates. So I’ll put him in the eleventh spot. I think the last spot is a total tossup. Valdes would give the Phillies three lefties, so I’ll go with De Fratus once again.

That gives us 12 pitchers: Halladay, Lee, Hamels, Lannan, Kendrick, Papelbon, Adams, Durbin, Bastardo, Horst, Aumont and De Fratus.

Ben Revere wants to get on base more.

This article talks about depth in the starting rotation beyond the top five starters. It’s not real good.

Former Phillie hitting coach Greg Gross comments on some past and current Phillie hitters in this article.


Irregular season

Freeze frame, November, 2012. The Phillies shock the baseball world by naming you their new GM. Your job — add a starting center fielder, a starting third baseman, a starting corner outfielder, a top setup man and a fifth starter. Trade Vance Worley, Trevor May, Josh Lindblom and Lisalverto Bonilla if you want, but make sure you take on less than $20 million in 2013 payroll.

Good luck.

If that’s your charge and you come back with Ben Revere, Michael Young, Delmon Young, John Lannan and Mike Adams, you’ve done your job.

Obviously Amaro had more flexibility than that, especially around who he traded. Keeping Worley would have made adding a fifth starter unnecessary. And some of the positions he filled from outside of the organization could have been filled from within. If the Phillies fail to play Domonic Brown just about every day to start 2013, they’re making a mistake. But they haven’t done that yet and, no matter what they say in January, I don’t think they will. And I don’t think that the off-season has been a disaster for the Phillies.

If there’s a disaster here, and despite how ugly 2012 was, I don’t think this is a disaster yet, it didn’t start this off-season. It started a couple of years ago and moves slow.

Success or failure for the 2013 Phillies is going to have a whole lot more to do with what Ryan Howard, Jonathan Papelbon, Chase Utley, Roy Halladay, Cole Hamels and Cliff Lee combine to produce for the $137ish million the Phils have committed to pay them than it will with what Delmon Young produces for the $750,000 they’ve committed to pay him. And a lot of what we saw in 2012 should make you worry about that group’s ability to produce $137 million worth of value in 2013.

You can pay all five of the new guys mentioned above this season with the $20 million the Phils have committed to Howard. With a couple of million left over. You can get most of the way there with the $13 million they’re going to pay Papelbon.

It’s a lotta eggs in a small number of baskets. There is no solution if those eggs can’t play anymore or simply have bad contracts — but it’s not Delmon Young’s fault, either. The choices are declare it’s over and rebuild or declare it’s not and do what you can with the limited flexibility that you have left. I’m glad they chose the later. This is what do what you can with the limited flexibility you have looks like.

Bottom line for me is that the Phillies may have made mistakes. Some of them are big mistakes. Maybe too big for the team to overcome in next few seasons. I’m a lot less sure they came this off-season, though.

Yesterday I updated my guess on who the hitters on the team are at this point. Earlier this month I made a guess on the pitching side. Here’s what I came up with then:

Other candidates
1 Halladay (R) P Aumont (R)
2 Lee (L) T Cloyd (R)
3 Hamels (L) J De Fratus (R)
4 Kendrick (R) M Schwimer (R)
5 Lannan (L) M Stutes (R)
6 Papelbon (R) BJ Rosenberg (R)
7 Adams (R) E Martin (R)
8 Bastardo (L) J Pettibone (R)
9 JC Ramirez (R)
10 Z Miner (R)
11 J Horst (L)
12 R Valdes (L)
J Diekman (L)
J Savery (L)
M Robles (L)
C Jimenez (L)

Assuming 12 pitching spots to start the season, I gave the four open slots to Horst, Aumont, Valdes and De Fratus.

Not a whole lot has changed since January 9. The Phillies signed free agent righties Rodrigo Lopez, Aaron Cook and Juan Cruz and announced that righties Justin Friend and Kyle Simon would be invited to camp as NRIs, along with lefty Adam Morgan.

The list looks pretty much the same in my mind these days, with the exception of the addition of a few candidates:

Other candidates
1 Halladay (R) P Aumont (R)
2 Lee (L) T Cloyd (R)
3 Hamels (L) J De Fratus (R)
4 Kendrick (R) M Schwimer (R)
5 Lannan (L) M Stutes (R)
6 Papelbon (R) BJ Rosenberg (R)
7 Adams (R) E Martin (R)
8 Bastardo (L) J Pettibone (R)
9 JC Ramirez (R)
10 Z Miner (R)
11 J Cruz (R)
12 A Cook (R)
R Lopez (R)
J Friend (R)
K Simon (R)
J Horst (L)
R Valdes (L)
J Diekman (L)
J Savery (L)
M Robles (L)
C Jimenez (L)
A Morgan (L)

I still feel pretty good about the Horst and Aumont picks. That gets the Phillies to ten pitchers — five starters and five relievers, including two lefties in Bastardo and Horst.

I feel like there’s a chance that Cook can challenge Lannan for the fifth starter job. But I still think Lannan is the guy. Kendrick ended the season pitching really well out of the rotation, but I shake the feeling that the Phillies would be better off using him as a long reliever. I don’t think that’s going to happen, though, at least not to start the season.

Assuming Kendrick is in the rotation, there’s still an issue about long relief. The Phillies don’t have a long man in the ten guys I mentioned. Juan Cruz seems like he might get some consideration for that role. I’d guess the Phils think Rosenberg could give them more than one inning.

I still think the last two spots are pretty wide open. Valdes and De Fratus were the two relievers I picked last time. Valdes was fantastic for the Phillies in 2012 and De Fratus has put up outstanding numbers in the minors over the last few years.

Valdes would be the third lefty in the pen, though. And they still wouldn’t have a long man. Stutes is the other guy who seems like a legit candidate if he shows he’s healthy early in camp. He was solid for the Phillies in 2011 and got four or more outs in 14 of his 57 appearances.

Anyway, I’ll stick with Horst, Aumont, Valdes and De Fratus for the last four spots. That leaves the Phils with 12 pitchers — Halladay, Lee, Hamels, Kendrick, Lannan, Papelbon, Adams, Bastardo, Horst, Aumont, De Fratus and Valdes. Still three lefties and still no long reliever. My top candidates among the guys not on that list would be Cruz, Rosenberg and Stutes.

This article suggests the Phillies have had the third-best off-season in the NL East.


The best of the rest

Game Score is an enormously flawed stat, but looking at the Start Log data for 2012 does help demonstrate part of what was wrong for the Phillies last year.

The average Game Score for a start by a Phillies pitcher in ’12 was 54.2, which is the lowest it has been since 2009. There were only two starters for the Phils in 2012 who posted an average Game Score for the year better than the team’s average of 54.2 — Hamels averaged 59.74 in his 31 starts and Lee averaged 58.93 in his 30. Halladay, notably, joined Worley, Blanton, Kendrick, Valdes, Cloyd and Rosenberg in the group of starters under the team’s 54.2 average.

In 2011, Halladay, Hamels and Lee all averaged Game Scores above 60.

The Phils had six games in 2012 in which their starter threw to a Game Score better than 80. Here are the teams six best starts for 2012 by Game Score:

April 5, Halladay 83. Phillies beat the Pirates 1-0 on Opening Day as Halladay allows two hits and no walks over eight shutout innings.

April 18, Lee 85. By Game Score, this is the second-best start of the year for the Phillies in 2012. Lee strikes out seven in ten shutout innings. Bastardo started the bottom of the eleventh in a scoreless tie and the Giants got an unearned run on two singles and a Wigginton error.

May 3, Blanton 87. Best start of the year for the Phillies by Game Score. Blanton throws a complete-game, three hit shutout and the Phils top the Braves 4-0. He threw just 88 pitches in the game.

August 7, Hamels 83. Best start of the year for Hamels as he throws a complete game, allowing five hits and no walks while striking out six. Howard hits a two-run homer in the top of the first as the Phils score three runs on their way to a 3-0 win over Atlanta.

August 10, Halladay 82. The only pitcher to make two starts with Game Scores over 80, Halladay allowed a run on two hits and no walks while striking out eight as the Phils topped the Cardinals 3-1, breaking a 1-1 tie in the bottom of the eighth on a two-run shot by Utley.

August 19, Kendrick 82. The third Game Score of 80 plus in a 12-day period for the Phils. Kendrick makes his best start of the year, allowing three hits and a walk over eight shutout innings while striking out seven. The Phillies score five runs charged to Randy Wolf in the first three innings and roll to an 8-0 win.

For the Phillies it was their first season since 2008 in which they didn’t get a start with a Game Score better than 90.

In 2011, Lee threw a complete-game shutout of the Nats on April 14, allowing three hits and a walk while striking out 12 and posting a Game Score of 92.

Halladay threw a perfect game on May 29, 2010 with a Game Score of 98.

There were two starts with a Game Score above 90 in 2009. On August 19, Lee struck out 11, walked none and allowed two singles in a complete game against the Snakes. The Phils won 8-1 and Lee’s Game Score was 92. On September 1, Hamels allowed two hits and a walk while striking out nine in a complete game shutout as the Phils topped the Giants 1-0. 91 Game Score in that start for Hamels.

This Q&A from the Phillies web site speculates that Michael Young could play some first base against lefties this year if Howard continues to struggle against them. Mayberry and Ruf seem like good candidates as well. Mayberry seems like the one of that trio who would not be terrible defensively at the position he was playing (left field, presumably) if he was in the lineup and not at first, which presumably makes it less likely he would be there than Ruf or Young if Howard was on the bench against a lefty.

This suggests that the Phillies and Bastardo have avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $1.4 million deal.

Article on 22-year-old lefty Adam Morgan here. Morgan threw to a 3.35 ERA in 158 2/3 innings over 27 appearances, 26 of which were starts, between Clearwater and Reading in 2012.

This article discusses the possibility that Michael Young will hit between Utley and Howard in 2013.

This article suggests the Phillies are seriously considering signing Delmon Young.

Update: The Phillies signed Delmon Young to a one-year, $750,000 deal. I would have guessed he would get more money than that. At least on paper, that’s a really good deal for the Phils to land the MVP of last year’s ALCS. No word yet they plan to play on paper next year, though. So brace yourself for the possibility there might be a bump or two ahead.

This says Young could earn as much as $3.5 million if all incentives are reached.

Young earned $6.75 million in 2012.


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