Archive for July, 2012

Stay away

Yesterday I pointed out that Shane Victorino isn’t doing much at all with the bat in road games this season. The Phillies have been miserable just about everywhere in 2012, but a little more miserable at home than on the road. They’re 20-23 away from home and a hide-your-eyes bad 17-27 at home.

Overall, the Phillies have allowed too many runs no matter where they’ve played this year. When it comes to scoring runs, though, they’ve been just fine on the road and miserable at home.

at Home NL Rank Away NL Rank
Runs allowed per game 4.39 11 4.72 11
Scored per game 3.77 11 4.70 3

That’s just ugly. The Phillies are kind of the gang that can’t shoot straight. They can’t prevent runs at home or away and they can’t score enough runs at home. What they have done is scored runs on the road.

So far in 2012, only two teams have allowed more runs than the 396 the Phils have given up. Houston has allowed 416 and Colorado has allowed 479.

Offensively they’re in the middle of the pack in the NL. The 368 runs they’ve scored is seventh-best.

Here’s the thing that seems odd, though. The overall offensive numbers for the Phillies at home and on the road are nearly identical:

PA AVG OBP SLG ISO
Home 1622 260 316 401 141
Away 1702 264 316 405 141

So hitting 260/316/401 with an isolated power of .141 at home has the Phillies at eleventh in the NL in runs scored per game at home. Hitting a very similar 264/316/405 with an isolated power of .141 on the road has them third in the NL in their games away from home. And on the road they’ve scored nearly a run more a game.

So. Huh?

Not completely sure what’s going on with that. Two thoughts, though.

The first one’s a guess and I can’t tell if it’s right or not without double-split data. But I would guess the situational hitting for the Phillies on the road has been better than it has at home.

The bigger one is that teams hit better at home. So if the Phillies don’t hit better at home, then their numbers are going to slump at home relative to the rest of the league.

Of the 16 NL teams, eight of them have scored more runs per game in their away games for the season than they have for their home games for the season (joining the Phils are Atlanta, New York, Pittsburgh, San Diego, San Francisco, St Louis and Washington). As you would expect, though, the splits overall for NL hitters are better at home than they are away:

AVG OBP SLG
Home 259 326 413
Away 248 310 391

So if, on average, everyone is a little better offensively at home than they are on the road and the Phillies stay the same at home and on the road, their numbers relative to the rest of the NL are going to be much better away than they are at home. And they are.

It’s just surprising to me if the difference in this case is the difference in being third in the league in runs scored and eleventh. I don’t think it can be, so there must be more going on.

(Side note on this: I would expect that the overall league split would usually be better at home than away. What I found was that it always, or very close to always, is. I took a quick look and couldn’t find an example of the OPS for the NL being better on the road than at home for any year after 1918, which is when I stopped looking. This hurts my brain and I don’t quite get it. I would not have guessed that the rules give enough of an edge to the home team to make this the case. As I mentioned in the post, so far this year in the NL eight of the 16 teams have scored more runs per game away from home than they have at home. In 2011, NL teams scored an average of 4.12 runs per game at home and an average of 4.14 runs per game away, but with a better OPS at home).

Halladay gave up a run on three hits over three innings for Clearwater last night.

I added a section to the bottom of the blue band in the Start Log that shows the needed winning percentage the Phillies would have to play to in their remaining games in order to get to various win marks. Also shows their projected win total for the year if they play to their existing winning percentage over their remaining games. Right now they’re on pace to go 69-93, which could be better.


Center fielder of attention

If you take a look at Shane Victorino’s splits for 2012, the first thing that’s sure to grab you is that he’s hitting a miserable 224/287/302 against right-handed pitching. There’s more, though. Victorino’s numbers away from home are about as bad as his numbers against righties if not worse. For the year, Victorino is hitting 218/281/351 on the road.

In 2012, his numbers against lefties are better than they’ve been over his career and his numbers at home are pretty similar:

2012 Career
vs left 316/391/592 298/372/513
Home 274/345/389 280/353/438

Victorino only has 87 plate appearances against lefties so far in 2012, but in those 87 he has delivered hits, walks and extra-bases hits all way above his career levels. Against both righties and lefties at home, he’s walked at a better rate than his career marks and gotten hits at about the same rate, but with less power.

Against righties and away from home, it’s been a different story. And that’s a problem given that about three quarters of his plate appearances (76.4%) have come against righties and more than half (52.3%) have come on the road.

2012 Career
vs right 224/287/302 267/329/401
Away 218/281/351 271/330/426

Victorino’s career numbers aren’t very good either on the road or against right-handed pitching, but both splits are way down in 2012. Over his career he’s been a lot better against lefties than righties and that trend has been magnified dramatically in 2012. His road and home splits are about the same in terms of hit rate and power, but he has walked more in his home games over his career, about 8.9% of his home plate appearances and about 6.7% of his plate appearances away from home.

Victorino has has good years against right-handed pitching, but not for a while. His first solid year against righties came in 2006 (292/345/409) and he followed that up with a 2007 in which he hit 276/339/394 against righties. 2008 was probably his best year against righties as he on-based .355 against them, putting up a 298/355/407 line. His hits and walks were off in a little against them in ’09, but he hit for more power: 283/347/440. After 2009 his numbers against righties took a huge dive. In 2010 he on-based .305 against them. 2011 he came back a little, on-basing just .335 but posting a career-high .455 slugging percentage against them. 2012 has been the worst year so far.

Here’s how his career numbers against right-handed pitching look broken up into groups of pre-2006, 2007-2009 and 2010-2012:

PA Vs RHP
Before 2006 83 176/232/243
2006-2009 1599 288/348/415
2010-2012 1190 245/311/392

If you compare the 2010-2012 numbers to the 2006-2009, Victorino has been more likely to get a walk against a righty since 2010 (8.0% of plate appearances vs righties since 2010 compared to 7.3% ’06-’09). He’s also hit for more power (isolated power of .147 since 2010 compared to .127 ’06 to ’09). His numbers are way, way down overall, though, and much of that is due to the fact that he has hit so many fewer singles. From 2006 through 2009, Victorino singled in about 26.0% of his plate appearances against right-handed pitching. Since the start of 2010 he has singled in about 22.4% of them.

Update: I noted in the comments section that Victorino’s batting average for balls in play for ’06 to ’09 was .312. From 2010 to 2012 it is .276. That could be bad luck or could be not as fast as he used to be. Or some of both. Either way, it seems important if his recent downturn is not about walking or hitting for power but getting as many singles.


Comparison dropping

Almost a year ago today, I wrote a post that looked at the record for the Phillies in games where the starters and bullpen pitched well and didn’t pitch well. For the purposes of that post, I counting appearances by starters and relievers as good outings if the starter or the combined relievers posted both an ERA under 4.00 and a ratio under 1.30 for that game.

Using those criteria, the table below shows how the numbers for 2012 compare to the numbers for 2011. In 2011, the Phillies played 91 games before the All-Star break, going 57-34.

2012 2011
Record WPCT % of games Record WPCT % of games
SP pitched well 25-16 .610 47.1 43-12 .782 60.4
SP didn’t pitch well 12-34 .261 52.9 14-22 .389 39.6
Bullpen didn’t pitch 3-0 1.000 3.4 9-2 .819 12.1
Bullpen pitched well 19-17 .528 41.4 32-9 .780 45.1
Pen didn’t pitch well 15-33 .312 55.2 16-23 .410 42.9
Pen and SP both not good 5-21 .192 29.9 2-14 .125 17.6
Pen and SP both good 12-4 .750 18.4 20-1 .952 23.1
SP good but pen not 11-12 .478 26.4 23-11 .676 37.4
Pen good but SP not 7-13 .350 23.0 12-8 .600 22.0

Looking first at the starting pitchers, the rotation has pitched well in a lower percentage of games (47.1% in 2012 compared to 60.4% in 2011) and the Phillies have been less likely to win when they do pitch well.

In all of 2011, the Phillies got a quality start in two-thirds of their games and went 83-25 in the games where they got a quality start. That’s a .769 winning percentage. The 2012 Phillies are on pace to make 95 quality starts for the year, 13 fewer than in 2011, and have gone just 30-21 (.588) in the games in which they got a quality start. That’s fewer quality starts and much worse results when they come.

The 2012 Phillies have just three complete games. Halladay, Lee and Hamels have combined to throw zero. Blanton has two and Kendrick has one. They’re on pace to throw about 5.5 for the year after throwing 18 complete games in 2011.

The bullpen has pitched well in a lower percentage of games in 2012 than it did in 2011 and pitched poorly in a higher percentage. The winning percentage for the Phillies is worse for the team both when the pen pitches well and when it doesn’t pitch well.

Pretty tough to win in the games when both the starters and the pen don’t pitch well. In both years the team had a winning percentage under .200. The pen and the starters have both been bad in nearly 30% of the games the Phils have played this season. After 91 games last year, the percentage of games where both were bad was just 17.6%.

At the break in 2011, the Phillies were 20-1 in games when both their starters and pen pitched well. They are just 12-4 this year.

The last two lines of the table might be the most telling. The 2011 Phillies still got a whole lot of wins in the games where either the starter or pen was good but the other was not. If you combine the last two lines, the Phillies are 18-25 (.419) in 2012 in games where either the starters or the relievers didn’t pitch well. In 2011 they were 35-19 (.648) in games where one or the other didn’t pitch well.

The NL won the All-Star Game 8-0. Hamels threw a scoreless inning, Papelbon got the only batter he faced and Ruiz went 0-for-1.


Math, reality and the bullpen all ganging up on the Phillies at the same time and the smart money is on math, reality and the bullpen

Today’s point is that losing all your games hurts your chances of getting to 90 wins.

When the season started, the Phillies needed to win about 5 1/2 of every ten games (a little more) to get to 90 wins for the season. Not so much anymore. If the Phils win 20 in a row coming out of the break, they will still need to play to a .600 winning percentage in their remaining 55 games to get to 90 wins.

To win 90 of 162 games, a team needs to play to a winning percentage of about .556. There aren’t 162 games left for the Phillies in 2012. Given their current 37-50 record, if the Phillies won their first 26 games to start the second half of the season, they would need a .551 winning percentage in their remaining games to get to 90 wins. If they won their first 25 they would need a .560 winning percentage in their remaining games to get to 90.

Here’s a look at the winning percentage the Phillies needed to play to for the rest of their games if they were going to get to 90 wins after each day they’ve played this season:

Date

Played

Wins needed for 90

Games left

WPCT needed

4/5
4/7
4/8
4/9
4/11
4/12
4/13
4/14
4/15
4/16
4/17
4/18
4/19
4/20
4/21
4/22
4/23
4/24
4/25
4/27
4/28
4/29
4/30
5/1
5/2
5/3
5/4
5/5
5/6
5/7
5/8
5/9
5/11
5/12
5/13
5/14
5/15
5/16
5/17
5/18
5/19
5/20
5/21
5/22
5/23
5/24
5/25
5/26
5/27
5/28
5/29
5/30
6/1
6/2
6/3
6/4
6/5
6/6
6/7
6/8
6/9
6/10
6/12
6/13
6/14
6/15
6/16
6/17
6/19
6/20
6/21
6/23
6/24
6/24
6/25
6/26
6/27
6/28
6/29
6/30
7/1
7/3
7/4
7/5
7/6
7/7
7/8

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4
5
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7
8
9
10
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14
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86
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59
59
58
57
57
56
56
56
55
54
54
54
54
54
54
54
53
53
53
53
53

161
160
159
158
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
149
148
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
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95
94
93
92
91
90
89
88
87
86
85
84
83
82
81
80
79
78
77
76
75

0.553
0.556
0.560
0.563
0.561
0.558
0.561
0.565
0.562
0.559
0.563
0.567
0.564
0.561
0.565
0.568
0.572
0.569
0.566
0.570
0.567
0.571
0.568
0.565
0.569
0.566
0.570
0.575
0.571
0.576
0.580
0.585
0.581
0.586
0.583
0.579
0.576
0.573
0.569
0.566
0.570
0.575
0.580
0.585
0.581
0.578
0.574
0.570
0.575
0.571
0.577
0.573
0.569
0.574
0.579
0.585
0.590
0.596
0.602
0.598
0.604
0.610
0.616
0.612
0.608
0.615
0.621
0.628
0.624
0.620
0.626
0.622
0.629
0.636
0.632
0.628
0.635
0.643
0.651
0.659
0.667
0.675
0.671
0.679
0.688
0.697
0.707

So, for example, the Phillies beat the Pirates 1-0 on Opening Day. After that day they had played one game and needed 89 more wins to get to 90. To win 89 of the 161 games they had left they would have needed to play to a .553 winnings percentage the rest of the way.

After losing to the Braves 4-3 on July 8, the Phillies are 37-50 and would need to play to a .707 winning percentage in their remaining 75 games to get to 90 wins. And while the Phils might go 53-22 the rest of the way, there’s an even bigger chance that won’t even happen.

The .553 needed winning percentage after the Opening Day win was the lowest mark on the year for the Phillies. The current .707 winning percentage is the highest it has been all season. The Opening Day win was the only day of the season in which the Phillies ended the day with a winning percentage for the year (1.000) that was greater than their needed winning percentage the rest of the way (.553) if they were going to get to 90 wins. Their current winning percentage of .425 is .281 lower than the .707 they would need the rest of the way to get to 90 wins. That’s the biggest difference between the two since the Phillies were 1-3 after four games.

The high mark for the year for the Phillies was three games over .500. That came after a June 1 win over the Fish that made them 28-25 on the season. They needed a .569 winning percentage (62-47) the rest of the way to get to 90 at that point, which was still higher than their .528 winning percentage for the year. Since then they’ve gone 9-25.

Eleven games ago, coming off of a June 26 win against the Pirates, their needed winning percentage the rest of the way was .628. Since then the Phillies have gone 1-10.

Going 10-1 in their first 11 games after the break doesn’t get the Phillies back to the same point they were at after winning on June 28, cause they have 22 fewer games to play and they were behind pace before they played the 22. If they go 10-1 in the first 11 after the break, they’re at 47-51 with 64 games left. They would need to go 43-21 over those 64 to get to 90 wins, which is a .672 winning percentage.

If they win 20 games in a row coming off the break, the Phillies are 57-50 and still have to play to a .600 winning percentage in their remaining 55 (33-22) games to get to 90 wins.

Running out of time is the theme here, cause the chart above is a lot less impressed with wins than it used to be and losses hurt a lot more, too. If the Phils win their first game after the break, they would need 52 wins in 74 games to get to 90. The needed winning percentage would drop from .707 to about .703. If they lost, though, they need 53 wins in 74 games. The needed winning percentage would rise much more substantially than it fell with a win, popping all the way up to .716. So the result of game one of the second half will either drop the needed winning percentage by about .004 or raise it by about .009.

There’s really not a lot of silver lining to be found. The closest I can get is that it isn’t going to take 90 wins to get into the playoffs. My guess is 88 does it and 86 or 87 gives you a solid chance.


Break, way down

The Phillies finished out their miserable first half yesterday, falling to Atlanta as the Braves completed a three-game sweep.

Jason Pridie, a late addition to the lineup after Victorino was scratched, provided all the offense the Phils would get in the game, going 2-for-3 with a double, a home run and three RBI. Raul Valdes surrendered a solo shot to Brian McCann in the top of the seventh, breaking a 3-3 tie in a game the Braves went on to win 4-3.

It was McCann’s third home run in the series and the second time in the three games the bullpen failed the Phils. In game one of the set the teams went into the eighth in a scoreless tie and Bastardo was charged with five runs.

Any hope that the return of Utley and Howard would spark the Phils to better play is all but vanished. The team is 1-9 in the games in which Utley has played and 0-2 in the games where Howard has played.

The Phillies are 37-50 on the year after losing to the Atlanta Braves 4-3 yesterday afternoon. The Braves sweep the three-game series. The Phillies go into the All-Star break in last place in the NL East, 14 games behind the first-place Nats. They’ve lost ten of 11 and are 9-25 over their last 34 games.

Worley got the start for the Phillies and went six innings, allowing three runs on seven hits and four walks. Three of the hits went for extra-bases, two doubles and a home run. He struck out five.

He walked Martin Prado and Jason Heyward back-to-back with one out in the top of the first, but got Brian McCann to hit into a double-play to turn Atlanta away.

He threw a 1-2-3 second. Up 2-0, Worley allowed a two-out single to Michael Bourn in the third, but got Martin Prado on a fly ball to center for the third out.

Freddie Freeman doubled with two outs in the fourth. Dan Uggla was next and homered to center, tying the game at 2-2. Andrelton Simmons followed that with another double and Worley walked Juan Francisco ahead of the pitcher Jair Jurrjens. Jurrjens grounded to first to leave Simmons stranded.

Three straight extra-base hits, the only three he allowed in the game.

The Phillies were back ahead at 3-2 when Worley started the fifth. Prado and Heyward reached on back-to-back singles with one out. Brian McCann was next and singled into center, scoring Prado (3-3) and moving Heyward up to second. Freeman flew to left before a walk to Uggla loaded the bases for Simmons. Lefty Eric Hinske hit for Simmons and struck out to leave the runners stranded.

Worley set the Braves down in order in the sixth.

Valdes started the seventh. He got the first two before McCann hit a 1-2 pitch out to center, putting the Braves up 4-3. Freeman followed with a single to center. Schwimer took over for Valdes and got the righty Uggla on a ball handled by Ruiz for the third out.

Valdes has been charged with at least one run in three of his last four appearances. Schwimer has a 1.32 ERA and an 0.95 ratio over his last 15 outings

Horst threw a 1-2-3 eighth. He’s allowed one hit and two walks in five scoreless innings over five appearances with the Phils.

Papelbon started the ninth and gave up a leadoff single to Bourn. He got the next two, with Bourn stealing second as he struck out Heyward for the second out. McCann struck out swinging to leave Bourn a second.

Papelbon has a 5.40 ERA in his 11 appearances since the start of June.

The Phillies lineup against righty Jair Jurrjens went (1) Rollins (2) Pierre (3) Utley (4) Howard (5) Ruiz (6) Pence (7) Pridie (8) Fontenot. Victorino was a late scratch with Pridie in center against the righty. Pierre in left against the righty and Fontenot at third.

Utley singled with two outs in the bottom of the first, but Howard struck out behind him.

Ruiz singled to start the second. Ruiz struck out for the first out, but Pridie was next and homered to right, putting the Phils up 2-0. Fontenot followed with a single and Worley bunted him to second with the second out. Rollins popped to Francisco in foul territory for the third out.

The Phillies went in order in the third.

The game was tied at 2-2 when they hit in the fourth. Pence walked with one out and scored when Pridie followed with a double to right, putting the Phils up 3-2. Fontenot and Worley went down behind Pridie.

A double, a home run and three RBI for Pridie in his first two at-bats.

It was 3-3 when the Phillies went in order in the fifth.

Ruiz singled with one out in the sixth, but Pence hit into a double-play behind him.

Down 4-3, the Phils went in order in the seventh. With the righty Jurrjens still on the mound, Wigginton hit for Schwimer with two outs and the bases empty and grounded to third.

Righty Kris Medlen set the Phillies down in order in the eighth.

Righty Craig Kimbrel threw a 1-2-3 ninth, striking out Howard and Ruiz and getting Pence on a fly ball to right.

Rollins was 0-for-4 in the game and 1-for-12 in the three-game series. He’s hitting 256/310/402 for the year. 210/262/315 away from home.

Pierre was 0-for-4 yesterday and 1-for-11 with a double in the series. 307/344/378. Your team has a whole lot of problems when you give Juan Pierre 262 plate appearances in the first half of the season, virtually all of which came as a corner outfielder, and that’s not even close to the top of the list of things that are wrong with the team. He’s hitting 250/283/364 over his last 95 plate appearances.

Utley 1-for-4. 1-for-11 with four strikeouts in the set. 8-for-34 (.235) for the year with a walk and two home runs.

Howard 0-for-4 and struck out twice. 2-for-8 with a double in the series in his first action of the year.

Ruiz 2-for-4 with a strikeout yesterday. 3-for-12 with a double in the series. 350/412/584 for the year. Fourth in the NL in average, fourth in on-base percentage and fourth in slugging.

Pence 0-for-3 with a walk, which was the only walk of the game for the Phils. 2-for-9 with two walks in the series. 285/352/482 for the year. 357/438/607 over his last 64 plate appearances.

Pridie 2-for-3 with a double, a home run and three RBI. He’s 3-for-5 on the year. Victorino didn’t play yesterday but was 1-for-7 with a walk and the series and hits the break at a miserable 245/311/369 and 2-for-his-last-16. 223/288/304 against right-handed pitching.

Fontenot 1-for-3 in the game and 1-for-6 on the season. 325/364/386 in 88 plate appearances for the season. Polanco was 0-for-3 in the series and is hitting 266/311/342 for the year. 197/282/250 over his last 86 plate appearances. 235/295/358 against lefties.

Next game for the Phillies in Friday night in Colorado.


R.U. !@#$% serious?

The Phillies battled Mets’s All-Star RA Dickey all night last night and by the time the ninth inning rolled around it looked like they had won. They gave Papelbon the ball and a 5-4 lead and he didn’t get it done. The closer allowed a pair of runs and the Phils fell 6-5.

Again the intensity was there for the Phillies and again the results were not. They’ve lost seven of their last eight games, three by a single run. Chase Utley has been very good since joining the team, but with last night’s loss the Phils are now 1-6 in the games in which he has played.

It was an extremely frustrating ninth inning for the Phils after a long, tight game that saw them score as many earned runs off of Dickey as the pitcher had allowed over his past seven starts coming into the contest. After a leadoff double, Papelbon got two quick outs and couldn’t put the Mets away. He didn’t get several close calls in two huge two-out at-bats ahead of back-to-back singles that plated the game-winning runs. The first one ended when he hit Jordany Valdespin with a 3-2 pitch and the other when he walked Ruben Tejada on the eighth pitch of Tejada’s plate appearance.

On June 4, Papelbon made news after a game with the Dodgers for saying the home plate umpire sucked and belonged in the minors. No idea whether it’s had any impact on the strike zone he’s seen since then, but I remember thinking at the time he shouldn’t be counting on getting a lot of close pitches for a while. He sure didn’t last night. Either way, Papelbon came into the game on June 4 with a 2.01 ERA and an 0.90 ratio for the season. Including the June 4 outing, over his last nine appearances he has thrown to a 7.00 ERA with a 2.11 ratio.

The Phillies are 37-47 on the year after losing to the New York Mets 6-5 last night. The Mets take the series two games to one. The Phillies are in last place in the NL East, 13 games out of first place.

Hamels got the start for the Phillies and went seven innings, allowing four runs on seven hits and a walk. Two of the hits went for extra-bases, both home runs. He struck out seven.

Up 1-0, he set the Mets down in order in the top of the first.

He started the second up 2-0. Scott Hairston led off and hit a 1-1 pitch out to left-center, cutting the lead to 2-1. Hamels got the next three.

The pitcher RA Dickey singled to left with one out in the third. Ruben Tejada popped up to Fontenot in foul territory for the second out before Daniel Murphy moved Dickey to second with a single. David Wright was next and he singled into center, scoring Dickey to tie the game at 2-2 and moving Murphy to third. Hamels walked Hairston and the bases were loaded for Lucas Duda. Hamels got the lefty Duda on a ground ball to first for the third out.

Up 3-2, Hamels set the Mets down in order in the fourth.

Tejada singled to center with one out in the fifth. Murphy was next and Hamels struck him out swinging 0-2 for the second out. Wright was next. Hamels got ahead of him 0-2, but Wright hammered a 1-2 pitch out to left for a two-run homer that put New York ahead 4-3. Hairston lined to third for the third out.

The Phillies led 5-4 when Hamels started the sixth. He got the first two before Thole singled to right. Hamels struck Kirk Neuwenhuis out swinging 3-2 to leave Thole at first.

Hamels threw a 1-2-3 seventh. Righty Justin Turner hit for Dickey and grounded to third for the first out. Victorino made a nice sliding catch on a ball hit by Tejada for the second out and Murphy popped to Fontenot for the third.

Bastardo threw a 1-2-3 eighth with the Phils still up a run.

Nice inning for Bastardo in a tight game. That’s the first time since June 9 he hasn’t allowed a hit or a walk in an appearance. Opponents have hit .303 against him over his last eight outings and he’s walked five in 7 2/3 innings.

Papelbon started the ninth. Ike Davis led off and lined a ball right over the glove of Rollins and into left center for a double. Ronny Cedeno ran for Davis at second. Josh Thole bunted Davis up to third with the first out. Papelbon blew Kirk Nieuwenhuis away on four fastballs, striking him out swinging 1-2 for the second out. Lefty Jordany Valdespin, who hit a three-run game-winner off of Papelbon on May 7, hit for the pitcher Bobby Parnell. Papelbon worked Valdespin inside and hit him with a 3-2 pitch, putting runners on the corners. Ruben Tejada was next and Valdespin stole second before Papelbon walked him on a 3-2 pitch, the eighth of his at-bat. Murphy was next. Papelbon got ahead of him 0-2 before Murphy hit a 1-2 pitch back up the middle. The ball went off of Papelbon’s leg and toward the first base line. Papelbon tracked it down near the line and had a chance to get Murphy with a tricky throw to first to end the game, but slipped fielding the ball and everyone was safe. Cedeno scored and the game was tied at 5-5 with the bases still loaded for Wright. Wright blooped the first pitch of his at-bat into right, just in front of a charging Pence for a single that scored Valdespin and ended the game.

Papelbon was throwing for the second day in a row. He has been charged with runs in four of his last five appearances. Opponents have hit .409 against him in those outings. He has a 4.87 ERA over his last 21 appearances, raising his ERA on the season from 0.82 after 11 appearances to 3.45.

The Phillies lineup against righty RA Dickey went (1) Rollins (2) Pierre (3) Pence (4) Ruiz (5) Victorino (6) Wigginton (7) Polanco (8) Fontenot. Utley on the bench after playing two straight days with Fontenot at second. Pierre in left against the righty. Wigginton plays first after homering in game two of the set.

Rollins led off the game with a walk and was forced at second on a ground ball by Pierre for the first out. Pence flew to center before Ruiz was hit by a pitch, putting men on first and second for Victorino. Victorino, hitting right-handed against the righty, singled into center, scoring Pierre to put the Phils up 1-0 with runners on first and third. Wigginton struck out swinging at an 0-2 pitch way out of the strike zone to leave the runners stranded.

Polanco singled on a ball in and out of the glove of Niewenhuis in center to start the second. Fontenot struck out for the first. Hamels tried to give himself up, but wound up bunting for a single that put runners on first and second for Rollins. Rollins doubled to right, scoring Polanco to make it 2-0 with men on second and third. Pierre lined softly to short for the second out and Pence fouled out to first to end the frame.

No out on the Hamels bunt helps the Phils, but they can’t get more after putting runners on second and third with one down. Pierre lines to short for the second out with the runners holding.

The lead was cut to 2-1 when Ruiz doubled to right to start the third. Victorino struck out, Wigginton struck out and Polanco struck out, leaving Ruiz at second.

It was 2-2 when the Phillies hit in the fourth. Fontenot led off with a single to center and Hamels struck out trying to bunt him to second for the first out. Rollins moved Fontenot to second with a single, putting two men on for Pierre. Pierre struck out swinging for the second out, but Pence followed with a single into center that scored Fontenot, putting the Phils up 3-2, and moved Rollins to second. Ruiz grounded to short for the third out.

Another tough at-bat for Pierre as he strikes out for the second out after being unable to bring the runner in from third with one out in the second.

Wigginton singled with one out in the fifth, but Polanco hit into a double-play behind him.

They trailed 4-3 when they started the sixth. Hamels singled with one out and scored when Rollins followed with a triple. 4-4. Pierre was next and put a pretty bunt down the first base line. Dickey fielded and threw to first as Rollins scored, putting the Phillies up 5-4. Pence grounded to short for the third out.

The Phils went in order in the seventh.

Fontenot doubled with one out in the eighth off of righty Jon Rauch. Utley hit for Hamels and lefty Tim Byrdak came in to pitch to him. Utley stayed in to face the lefty and singled to shallow left. Fontenot tried to score from second, but Hairston’s throw from left was on line and beat him to the plate by a lot. He blasted Thole, but Thole held the ball for the second out. Utley moved up to second on the play at the plate and Byrdak walked Rollins intentionally, putting two men on for Pierre. Mayberry hit for Pierre with the lefty still on the mound. Righty Pedro Beato came in and got Mayberry on a ground ball to third to end the frame with both men stranded.

Righty Bobby Parnell set the Phillies down in order in the ninth.

Rollins was 3-for-3 with two walks, a double and a triple in the game. 4-for-12 with two walks, two doubles and a triple in the set. 262/318/414 for the year.

Pierre 0-for-3 with an RBI and five men left on base in the game. 2-for-7 with two singles in the series. 317/355/387 for the year.

Pence was 1-for-5 with an RBI. 4-for-12 with four singles and two RBI in the set. 287/351/489 for the year.

Ruiz was 1-for-4 in the game and 4-for-12 with a double and two home runs in the series. 355/419/596 on the year.

Victorino 1-for-5 with an RBI. 1-for-13 in the series. 247/313/373 on the season.

Wigginton 1-for-4 with two strikeouts. 3-for-7 with two walks and a home run in the series. 203/259/351 over his last 81 plate appearances. 249/320/402 for the year.

Polanco 1-for-4 in the game and 2-for-11 with a walk in the series. 205/293/260 over his last 83 plate appearances. 269/314/346 on the year.

Fontenot 2-for-4 with a double in his only action of the series, raising his line on the season to 338/378/403.

Kendrick (2-8, 5.35) faces righty Tim Hudson (6-4, 3.87) tonight. The Phillies have lost four of the last five games that Kendrick has started and he’s thrown to a 7.67 ERA in those outings. Lefties are on-basing .404 against him for the season. Hudson threw to a 1.93 ERA in June, but allowed six runs to the Nats in his only start in July. He’s allowed just four home runs on the season and righties are hitting 245/288/325 against him for the year.


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