The Phils take two of three from the Blue Jays thanks to a win yesterday, which came with a big assist from Jamie Moyer. Moyer’s ratio for the season is at 1.05 and the Phillies are 9-6 in the games he’s started. That’s a better mark than they have in the games started by Halladay (9-7) or Hamels (8-7) or any other pitcher who has started more than one game (they’re 1-0 when Figueroa starts, but that might not be a formula for long-term success).

On June 11 in Boston, Moyer allowed nine runs in an inning against the Red Sox. It’s the only start in his last six in which he’s allowed more than two runs. In his other 14 starts he has thrown to a 3.49 ERA with an 0.95 ratio. In eight of 15 starts he’s allowed two runs or fewer. Overall for the season his ERA sits at 4.30, coming off of a year where he threw to a 5.34 ERA in his 25 starts and a whole lot of people thought he was done.

So what’s he doing differently this year? He allowed a ton of home runs last year, but it’s not just about home runs. Moyer has allowed 15 home runs in 96 1/3 innings, which means he would allow about 31 over 200 innings. Only five NL pitchers have allowed more home runs than Moyer on the year and 24 have pitched more innings. He’s allowing about 1.40 home runs per nine innings, which is worse is worse than his career rate of 1.14 per nine innings if improved over his ’09 rate of 1.50 per nine innings (1.63 per nine as a starter).

Overall, the hits that he’s allowing haven’t done less damage in 2010 than they did in 2008 and 2009 or over his career. He’s actually allowing more bases per hit this year than he has over his career and in 2008 and 2009 combined:

Year Hits
Total
Bases
TB per hit
2010 84 147 1.75
2008 + 2009 376 600 1.60
Career 4137 6571 1.59

So the hits that he’s allowing are just as bad if not worse and he’s still allowing a lot of home runs.

What he is doing is allowing a whole lot fewer hits and walks.

Opponents are hitting just .230 against Moyer on the season. Righties are hitting .241 and lefties are hitting .177. Moyer had a couple of years where he held righties under .241, but the .230 mark overall and .177 for lefties are his best in, well, forever. When it comes to Jamie Moyer, forever is a long time. Here’s what righties and lefties have hit against him over his career:

Year Overall Right Left
2010 230 241 177
2009 279 290 243
2008 262 270 240
2007 285 279 309
2006 277 285 251
2005 283 277 297
2004 272 264 290
2003 246 232 276
2002 230 206 282
2001 239 234 255
2000 281 278 290
1999 267 278 234
1998 256 255 258
1997 256 234 322
1996 276 265 309
1995 265 251 306
1994 271 268 286
1993 265 256 304
1992 Did Not Pitch
1991 319 266 520
1990 290 308 222
1989 283 294 214
1988 272 281 228
1987 271 278 222
1986 311 313 300
       
Career 267 265 272

In 2003, opponents also hit .230 overall against. Moyer. But it’s a better .230 this year (.23013) than it was in ’03 (.23023).

Lefties are 11-for-62 against Moyer this year. The .177 average he has held them to is nearly a hundred points better than their .272 over his career.

Moyer’s batting average for balls in play is at a career-low .230 overall and a microscopic .119 for left-handed hitters. So maybe he’s been a little bit (or a lot) fortunate. It’s also true, though, that Moyer’s walks are down significantly from his career levels. The percentage of batters he faces who walks is down for the third season in a row and this year it’s down a lot:

Year PA BB % of PA BB
2010 390 17 4.4
2009 699 43 6.2
2008 841 62 7.4
2007 867 66 7.6
       
Career 17,031 1,134 6.7

Moyer has walked 17 batters in 96 1/3 innings this season, which is about 1.59 per nine innings. That’s the best mark he’s had for any year of his career. He’s only had one other season where he walked fewer than 1.89 men per nine inning. For the Mariners in 1998 he issued 42 walks in 234 1/3 innings (1.61 walks per nine).

Madson threw an inning for Single-A Clearwater yesterday and allowed a run.

Sounds like we shouldn’t be expecting to see Polanco tonight and maybe not for a couple of days.