Pedro wasn’t the only Phillies pitcher who was better at preventing extra-base hits with men on base in 2009. Among the players who faced at least 100 batters, all of the pitchers on the chart below were also better at preventing extra-base hits when they pitched with at least one runner on base. The “Bases Empty” and “Men On” columns show how many extra-base hits the pitcher allowed in ’09 per 100 plate appearances and, on average, how many bases those hits went for when they did. The right-most column shows how many times larger their rate of allowing extra-base hits with the bases empty was than their rate of allowing extra-base hits with at least one runner on base.

Bases Empty Men On
XBH per 100 PA TB per
XBH
XBH per
100 PA
TB
per XBH
Empty/On
Chan Ho Park 7.1 2.43 6.7 2.45 1.1
Chad Durbin 8.1 2.86 4.9 2.71 1.7
Scott Eyre 8.3 2.60 4.4 3.33 1.9
J.A. Happ 8.8 2.76 6.4 2.84 1.4
Jamie Moyer 8.8 2.92 8.2 2.96 1.1
Brad Lidge 10.2 2.73 8.1 3.27 1.3
Jack Taschner 10.5 3.17 4.7 2.00 2.3
Rodrigo Lopez 13.4 2.67 11.4 2.00 1.2
Brett Myers 14.6 2.89 7.6 3.33 1.9
Pedro Martinez 17.3 2.78 2.3 2.50 7.5

So, for example, Chan Ho Park allowed 7.1 extra-base hits per 100 plate appearances with the bases empty and 6.7 per 100 plate appearances with at least one man on base. 7.1 over 6.7 is about 1.1. The XBH he allowed with the bases empty went for an average of 2.43 total bases and the XBH he allowed with at least one man on went for an average of 2.45 total bases.

Again, Pedro was the king of not allowing extra-base hits with men on base, allowing them more than seven times more with the bases empty.

Here are the pitchers on the Phillies from last year who were more likely to give up an extra-base hit with men on base than with the bases empty:

Bases Empty Men On
XBH per 100 PA TB per
XBH
XBH per
100 PA
TB
per XBH
On/Empty
Kyle Kendrick 0.0 - 2.2 4.00 -
Clay Condrey 3.0 3.33 8.2 2.83 2.8
Tyler Walker 3.8 3.00 8.3 3.00 2.2
Ryan Madson 5.3 2.89 6.7 2.60 1.3
Antonio Bastardo 7.9 2.80 16.3 2.57 2.1
Joe Blanton 8.1 2.90 8.7 2.90 1.1
Cliff Lee 8.6 2.19 9.3 2.92 1.1
Cole Hamels 8.7 2.73 9.4 2.72 1.1

Bastardo was kind of the anti-Pedro, allowing extra-base hits to more than 16% of the batters he faced with men on base. Bastardo didn’t get a whole lot of chances to face batters with men on base, just 43 plate appearances, but opponents hit 385/442/667 in the chances they did get, which is something he might want to improve upon. Condrey and Walker were among the best pitchers at preventing extra-base hits with the bases empty last year. I’m just saying.

The Phils beat the Pirates yesterday 4-2. Moyer pitched well, allowing two runs on solo homers over six innings to drop his spring ERA to 1.53. Ruiz was 2-for-3 with a walk, raising his average to .207. Werth and Ibanez combined to go 0-for-4. Werth’s average is down to .167 while Ibanez is hitting .122.

In the problem department, however, the Phillies have bigger fish to fry. They put Joe Blanton on the DL yesterday with a strained oblique — the team’s third starter is expected to miss three to six weeks. Kendrick will take Blanton’s spot in the rotation and Andrew Carpenter is likely to be added to the roster to pitch out of the bullpen.

That’s really not good. Losing Blanton potentially till the middle of May is a big deal, but I think it’s an even bigger problem for a bullpen that was weak to start with.

Josh Fogg seems like he would be a better choice for the roster spot than Carpenter, but Fogg has struggled with a muscle in his side this spring and did not pitch for the Mets in spring training before he was given his release.

This, from The Denver Post’s Troy Renck, suggests the Phils may be interested in Tim Redding. Redding has an ERA over five for the past two seasons and threw to an 8.76 ERA with a 2.03 ratio for the Rockies this spring, allowing 21 hits in 12 1/3 innings.

Brad Lidge and JC Romero are eligible to be activated from the DL on April 10. I would advise against holding your breath.