The Phils rolled off ten wins in a row this month thanks to a fantastic effort all-around. All the fantasticness was enough to make me wonder what group of Phillies it was that had picked things up the most all-around.

Here’s a look at the runs the Phillies scored and allowed during the ten-game winning streak and over the other 82 games of the season as well as the rates the starting and relief pitchers allowed runs per game (nothing in this post includes the results from last night’s game):

  R RA RA SP RA RP
10-game
streak
5.70 2.60 1.80 0.80
Other 82
games
5.33 4.91 3.26 1.66

First of all, whoever it was it wasn’t the hitters. The offense scored more runs per game over the ten-game winning streak, but not by a whole lot. The Phillies were much better at preventing runs as they cut their rate of allowing runs nearly in half.

The starters are relievers were both awesome over the streak. The numbers above make it look like the relievers were a little better because they cut their rate down in the streak more than the starters did. The relief pitchers allowed less than half of their runs per inning. The starters cut the number down a lot as well, but not in half.

I don’t think you want to conclude that it was the relievers who had the bigger impact from that, though, because the fact is that the starters threw a lot more innings per game during the streak than they did over the 10-game winning streak.

The starting pitchers were fantastic. Here’s what they did in their ten starts in the win streak compared to their other 82 starts for the year.

  ERA Ratio
10-game
streak
2.60 0.95
Other 82
games
5.04 1.44

And, for both the starters and relievers, here’s a look at how many innings per game they pitched during the streak and the rest of the season and their rates of runs allowed per inning:

 
Starters

Relievers
  IP per G R per IP IP per G R per IP
10-game
streak
6.23 .29 3.47 .23
Other 82
games
5.75 .57 3.29 .50

There were more innings pitched per game during the streak than there were the other 82 games of the season. For one thing, ten wins means ten times you have to pitch at least nine innings to win the game (if it’s not called early). They also played a 13 inning game against the Cubs and a 12 inning came against the Marlins. The starters were definitely going deeper into games, but the relievers were also called on to throw more innings than they had over the rest of the year. By percentages, the starters threw about 64.2% of the innings during the streak (leaving about 35.8% to the relievers), which is a little higher than the percentage of the innings they pitched during the other games. During the other 82 games the starters had thrown about 63.6% of the innings while the relievers threw about 36.4% of the innings.

Both the starters and relievers were pitching more in the streak than they did outside the streak. For the starters it was a little bit more of a difference. They were throwing about 108.3% of their innings per game compared to 107.4% of the relievers innings per game. It was the relievers, though, that cut their rate of runs allowed per inning more dramatically in the streak. The relievers rate of .23 runs per inning over the ten games is less than half of what it was during the other 82 games of the season. For the starters the rate of runs allowed per inning is also much improved, but not quite cut in half.

So I think the question of who improved more during the streak is still a little up in the air. Before looking into it I would have guessed the starters. Both groups pitched very well and both pitched more than they were used to. The starters gave a few more extra innings and the relievers increased their effectiveness at preventing runs by a little more. The case for the relievers may be a little stronger, though, given that both groups were throwing more innings and the pen cut their rate of allowing runs more dramatically.

The Phillies put Durbin and Romero on the DL and called up Tyler Walker and Andrew Carpenter. The move leaves Scott Eyre as the only lefty in the pen for the Phils. Walker had been designated for assignment on July 17 and was not picked up by another team. He had been assigned to Triple-A on Wednesday.