The Phillies both hit and pitched very well last season, but if you compare the number of runs they scored and allowed on the way to winning the World Series to what they’ve done in recent seasons, the difference in the number of runs they allowed in 2008 is much more dramatic than the difference in the number of runs they scored.

In 2008, the Phillies scored the fewest runs they have scored in five seasons:

Year Runs AVG OBP SLG OPS
2004 840 267 345 443 788
2005 807 270 348 423 772
2006 865 267 347 447 794
2007 892 274 354 458 812
2008 799 255 332 438 770

Last season the Phillies hit to their worst average over the past five years, posted their lowest on-base percentage and their second-worst slugging percentage. They scored the fewest runs they had scored since 2003 when they scored 791. After finishing third in the NL in runs scored in 2004 and second in 2005, the Phils led the NL in runs scored in 2007 and 2006 before tying for second with the Mets in ’08.

The pitching, however, is another story. In 2008 the Phillies allowed the fewest runs in the past five seasons by a wide margin.

Year Runs
allowed
NL Rank
2004 781 13
2005 726 T-8
2006 812 T-12
2007 821 12
2008 680 3

After struggling badly in 2006 and 2007, the Phillies allowed about 130 fewer runs in 2008 than they had in each of the past two seasons. The Phillies haven’t allowed 680 or fewer runs in a 162-game season since 1991 (when they also allowed 680). In 1995 they allowed 658 runs over 144 games — allowing runs at that rate would have put them at about 740 over 162 games. They allowed 497 runs in 115 games in 1994, about 4.32 runs per game, which would have had them at about 700 over 162 games.

The Phillies haven’t allowed fewer than 680 runs in a season since 1985, when they allowed just 673.

Cole Hamels signed a three-year, $20.5 million deal with the Phillies, which is great for Phillies fans for a bunch of reasons, including that it will limit the amount of time we will have to spend reading about Cole Hamels’ contract negotiations over the next few years.

Greg Dobbs signed a two-year deal worth $2.5 million.

Ryan Madson turned down a three-year, $12 million offer from the Phillies.

Nomar still undecided about whether he will play baseball this year. Scored in overtime to lead his team to a win over wife Mia Hamm’s team in the Celebrity Soccer Challenge over the weekend.

Update: The Phillies have now signed Madson to a three-year deal, believed to be worth $12 million.